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Lean Six Sigma Process Improvement Results:
Classroom Incidents Reduced by 50%!

When children act up, it makes it hard for other kids to learn. Learn how Lesley Guertin of nonprofit Cape Cod Child Development managed to reduce classroom incidents by 50%.


Project Summary

Improving the Classroom Environment to Reduce Incidents

Due to an increased number of incident reports being submitted over a 6 month period at Cape Cod Child Development, Lesley Guertin and her team of problem-solvers set out to identify the root causes of the issue and improve the process.

Goal Statement: To decrease the number of incident reports from 30 to 15 a month by the end of the school year.

Definitions:

  • Incident: any behavioral, accidents, property destruction and emergency deemed in a classroom setting
  • JRI: Justice Resource Institute – Agency supporting behavioral services to children

My project really is focused on lowering the number of incident reports in the classroom.

Define Phase: Identify the Problem

After using the Voice of the Customer Translation Matrix and creating a SIPOC of the process, Guertin and her team found that:

  • It takes too long for JRI to come out for classroom observation/intervention.
  • Staffing issues hinder time for release of staff to submit the incident reports electronically.
  • Overall the administration shared that they would like to prevent incidents from occurring in the first place.

Key Take Aways:

  1. This project needed to address the process of incidents reported to JRI.
  2. The process of support requires 5 steps, not including the outputs to the process.

It impacts the children, it impacts the families, and also impacts the staff members that are working with the children.

Lean Six Sigma Tools Used: Project Charter, VOC Translation Matrix, SIPOC


Measure Phase: Quantify the Problem

To collect data, the team measured the number of incidents using a Histogram and developed a data collection plan. They learned that:

  • There was a peak of incidents from from September to October.
  • There were, on average, two incidents being reported on a daily basis.

…when I first initially took on this project, I really looked at 30 being the number. But actually when I started to collect the data, I found that really the median was 60 instead of 30. So that even doubled that even more.

Lean Six Sigma Tools Used: Data Collection Plan, Histogram


Analyze Phase: Identify the Cause of the Problem

It was time to identify the root causes of the incidents. By creating a Fishbone Diagram and using the 5 Whys to help analyze the root causes, the team learned that:

  1. The classroom environment had a large impact on the number of incidents that were occurring.
  2. There is a lack of strategy that was being utilized by the teachers to prevent the incidents.
  3. According to the data in the Pareto Chart, children hurting children, children throwing toys and children hurting staff were the highest incidents that were reported from September 2016 to June 2016.

…really the classroom environment seemed to have a big impact among other things.

Lean Six Sigma Tools Used: Fishbone Diagram, 5 Whys, Pareto Chart, Run Chart


Improve Phase: Implement and Verify the Solution

Now that Guertin and her team of problem-solvers were able to identify the root causes of the more frequent types of incidents that were occurring, the team began to implement improvements, such as:

  • Focusing on classrooms that reported the most incidents by constructing safe areas for children and larger areas for play
  • Developing an internal referral form that allows more time for external support in classrooms

The Improvement Results:

  • By using a Run Chart to measure improvement, it is noted that there had been a decline of incidents regarding the classrooms where the environments were changed.
  • The team saw an overall decrease in incidents being reported by 50%!

…So going in and just making those site adjustments to the environment really drastically impacted the amount of incident reports that were coming in to me.

Lean Six Sigma Tools Used: Solution Selection Matrix


Lesley Guertin - GoLeanSixSigma.com

Your data tells a story. So you have to incorporate and interpret your data and see where it’s going to take you because it’s going to take you in a totally different direction.

Lesley Guertin
Quality Assurance Specialist/Coach Mentoring/SPED, Cape Cod Child Development

Control Phase: Maintain the Solution

By implementing a Monitoring & Response Plan, the team has been able to control the results of the implemented solutions. They are currently measuring the number of incidents, types of incidents, and when changes are made to the classroom environment. By developing the response plan they are able to make sure that they are able to give feedback, track the most frequent incidents that are still occurring, as well as monitor classroom arrangement changes.

Project Benefits & Lessons Learned:

  • The impact of physical changes in the environment can make a difference in the behaviors of children in the classroom.
  • It is best to look at examples of the Bahama Bistro and then interpret it into your own process.
  • Observing and determining if children will need special needs and/or behavior services will impact the quality of services for children by providing classroom support when needed.

You have to look at your examples and then try to interpret it into your own data. And what is it – how is it going to work for you? I’m not saying it’s going to work for you but how can I make this work for my process?

Lean Six Sigma Tools Used: Monitoring & Response Plan, Project Benefits & Lessons Learned


A Sneak Peak Into the Full Success Story Webinar:

Elisabeth Swan: So just a few questions for you, one, you just mentioned that you looked at those examples from the Bahama Bistro and really tried to interpret it because as you said the nonprofit culture is so different from the for profit culture. So do you have any advice for someone who is looking to apply process improvement in the nonprofit industry now having done it yourself?

Lesley Guertin: I think look at your data. Your data tells a story. So you have to incorporate and interpret your data and see where it’s going to take you because it’s going to take you in a totally different direction. Reading my data, you’re looking at number then looking at the cause, why? Then I’m kind of making some improvements and changing the classroom environment and then moving forward.

Your data tells a story. So you have to incorporate and interpret your data and see where it’s going to take you because it’s going to take you in a totally different direction.

And I think not only has Six Sigma helps with helping interpret my data but it has helped me with just my life in general. I’m taking it to another level of everything. I’m looking at it with Six Sigma eyes and really kind of interpreting it even in my own business.

Elisabeth Swan: Oh, what you have done in your own business?

Lesley Guertin: So I’ve been actually tracking some data in my own business. I have the number of orders that I’m getting a day and then I’m looking at the time it takes and where I actually should get them out. So I’m looking at all …

Elisabeth Swan: In order to ship?

Lesley Guertin: Yup. All the stuff I’m using Six Sigma not only in my nonprofit but for my for-profit as well. So it’s really taking a really great tool in my life personally and professionally.

So it’s really taking a really great tool in my life personally and professionally.



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Success Story Transcript

Elisabeth Swan: Hello and welcome to our Success Story series hosted by GoLeanSixSigma.com. My name is Elisabeth Swan and I’m a Managing Partner and Executive Advisor at GoLeanSixSigma.com.

We are very excited to have this offering for our audience because this is where the rubber meets the road. This is when we highlight someone who has completed a real project that has been implemented with real impact. And we get to share those stories with you.

About the Presenter

Today, we are highlighting a project success story from Cape Cod Child Development. And our presenter today is Lesley Guertin. Cape Cod Child Development has a mission to provide world-class child and family-focused programs that nurture each child’s full potential.

And within that, Lesley is the Quality Assurance Specialist. Lesley has been the Quality Assurance Specialist for seven years now. Lesley began as a lead teacher so she knows these environments well and what it takes to be effective in the classroom.

Lesley and her husband have three kids and shockingly, two grandchildren. Lesley, how did that happen? When she is not doting on her two 6-month-old grandchildren, she is busy with her own custom letter painting business.

Lesley, you are busy.

Lesley Guertin: I am very busy.

Elisabeth Swan: You are very busy. Thanks for joining us today and thanks for sharing your success story.

Lesley Guertin: You’re welcome.

Elisabeth Swan: So tell us a little bit about your project.

Decrease Incidents Reports

Lesley Guertin: My project really is focused on lowering the number of incident reports in the classroom. So basically, what an incident really is, is disruptive behavior in the classroom by children starting anywhere from drawing chairs to climbing furniture to hurting other children and staff members.

My project really is focused on lowering the number of incident reports in the classroom.

Define Phase

So in the last six months, we received a large number of incident reports, this is last year, and we have currently put some support in place. We have JRI, which is our Justice Resource Institute. It helps with our mental health pieces in the classroom. And we are also doing a lot of coaching at some of those sites.

So, we really want to really decrease the number of incident reports. So really, we typically – we were looking at 30 and we wanted to cut that in half and look at it as 15.

Elisabeth Swan: Yeah. And I know just as an observer, in case your eye doesn’t get it that obviously any of these incidents impact all the kids.

Lesley Guertin: It impacts the children, it impacts the families, and also impacts the staff members that are working with the children.

It impacts the children, it impacts the families, and also impacts the staff members that are working with the children.

Elisabeth Swan: So it really cuts down on your ability to be effective.

Lesley Guertin: Absolutely.

Project Charter

So really taking a look at my voice of the customer. Looking at my customers, they were the teachers. They really were the center managers. They were also the administrators. And really taking a look at what were they saying? What were the issues? Taking a long time for the initial referral to go in, to actually having JRI services in their classroom, not having enough time to submit their incident reports, and also, just to see fewer incident reports from administration and how to prevent the accidents from happening and the amounts that were documented.

Taking a long time for the initial referral to go in, to actually having JRI services in their classroom, not having enough time to submit their incident reports, and also, just to see fewer incident reports from administration and how to prevent the accidents from happening and the amounts that were documented.

Measure Phase

Baseline Number of Incidents Per Month: Sept 2016 – February 2017

So here’s my baseline data. So really, there is a huge peak of incident reports from September to October. And it’s noted that the incidents were on the decline in November but then continued to climb back in December. So really, when I first initially took on this project, I really looked at 30 being the number but actually when I started to collect the data, I found that really the median was 60 instead of 30. So that even doubled that even more.

Elisabeth Swan: It just kept spiking.

Lesley Guertin: It just kept spiking.

Baseline Histogram of Incidents

So this is my histogram. So on average, there were two incident reports that were reported to me on a daily basis.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s a lot.

Lesley Guertin: That’s a huge amount.

Analyze Phase

Fishbone Diagram

So this is my fishbone. And really, what I took out of this fishbone diagram is really the bottom keys, the root causes, really the classroom environment seemed to have a big impact among other things. And something that I highlighted there too is the lack of strategies that were being utilized by the teachers. And I think that’s done from their classroom environment because when you have a classroom environment that is not effective, you then find ineffective teaching practices that go along with that as well.

…really the classroom environment seemed to have a big impact among other things.

Elisabeth Swan: Kind of a snowball effect.

Lesley Guertin: It is.

Pareto of Incident Types

So here’s my Pareto Chart. So if you look at the type of instances that are occurring, hurting children, throwing toys and hurting staff was the highest incidents reported. And this data was taken from September 2016 to June of 2016. So you can see there’s a huge amount. And taking a look at this from the outside is we really have to look at safety, safety of the children in the classroom but also from our staff because the staff is getting hurt as well.

Elisabeth Swan: So you see things like throwing toys, running, climbing furniture, these real high activity and …

Lesley Guertin: And it was a trend throughout our classrooms, throughout the whole Cape. So it’s a huge trend going on.

So what I decided to do is I decided to take one of the classroom that had the high number of instances. And this classroom is located in West Main. And as you can see here, this is the before classroom. The block area as you know, it is a little bit small, a bit congested, so is the house area. We have a widespread running area below the classroom with not much confinement and a lot, a lot of shelving in the next which breeds climbing and jumping from.

So we really take a look at this environment as a 3 to 5 roll. It’s a running haven and it’s not really safe and nurturing environment. Not enough space to play where the high number of spaces that are supposed to be played in. They’re very small. However, you have a large amount of room and spaces that are not really connected to a learning environment.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s so interesting once I hear someone who has been in the classroom described this because I would never have looked at a shelf and thought, “Oh, there is something to climb on.” But if I’m looking through the eye of a 5-year-old then absolutely I’m going to climb on that.

Lesley Guertin: It’s a stage for them.

Elisabeth Swan: A stage. And then I think the T1, T2, T3, those are the tables.

Lesley Guertin: Those are the tables.

Elisabeth Swan: But otherwise as you say, some of your biggest as far as in the predator were running and throwing toys and there is big arena to really hurl the toy and to get up again and has a steam while you’re running. And I hadn’t thought about that. You got that doll house area and you’ve got the black area and you used the word “congested” like the kids don’t have really enough room to enjoy that space, expand into it and use it properly.

Lesley Guertin: And also when you think about the hurting children and hurting staff, if you have just four 3 to 5-year-olds playing in the housekeeping area and it’s so congested that way, that’s when you have another child lashing out at another child because they don’t have that space. Children need space to play. So if you don’t have really much space to play and they have to really understand how to share their spaces, they can’t at this age, not yet, then you’re going to see a lot of that.

Children need space to play. So if you don’t have really much space to play and they have to really understand how to share their spaces, they can’t at this age, not yet, then you’re going to see a lot of that.

Elisabeth Swan: You know it even happens with adults being crowded into cubicles. You can imagine those 5-year-olds would get annoyed.

Lesley Guertin: Absolutely.

Elisabeth Swan: This is a great chart. This spoke volumes to me.

Improve Phase

Lesley Guertin: So basically in my improve phase, what I really wanted to look at is classroom and violence and the description of incidents really was my takeaway on this matrix. Really what I did was I changed some of the classroom environments where I saw a high number of incidents and also the implementation of an internal referral form which I’ll get into talking about that in a little bit.

But really, I thought the impact of changing the environment on just not three classrooms. And one of them we just noted. But choose three classrooms that had higher number of incidents to go and do some impactful change in their physical environment.

…choose three classrooms that had higher number of incidents to go and do some impactful change in their physical environment.

Elisabeth Swan: So trial change. You pick the ones that really needed, “OK, this pilot this and see how it works.”

Layout: West Main Classroom After

Lesley Guertin: So as you can see now, this is the aftermath of that West Main classroom. So you can see the housekeeping area and the block area has more safe to play. The tables are more uniformed and there are actually areas in the classroom that children can go to which we like to call safe areas in our agency but some other classrooms or school like to call it quiet space.

So in these classrooms, it’s large enough. It’s located in our high school. So it’s actually a typical-looking classroom, a little elementary school per se. So it is a large area. So I decided to define three safe areas for the children to go to. So they have a space that they can be alone. They can depress and they can – they just have a space to go to when they need to be alone.

I also defined an art area. I took a lot of shelving units out of this classroom so that there was not a lot of …

Elisabeth Swan: Launch pads.

Lesley Guertin: Exactly. All we had to do is put some trampolines in there and it will be great. But really, I try to define the areas and made those learning areas such as the block and housekeeping areas large enough spaces to have some of that movement so children can play and able to have teachers kind of going in because in the before, teachers are not able to go into that place because there’s not enough room.

But now, there’s plenty of space for staff members or teachers go in there, sit with the children, problem-solve with children, help them kind of play because we have to learn how to play. And this gives an ample amount of room to be able to do that.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s nice. So when took away all the shelving, did you create a storage to put the things that were in the shelves? How do you deal without shelving?

Lesley Guertin: Well, I told the teachers, I said, “Well, let’s take a look at …” we have an environmental tool that we use in classrooms. It’s called ECERS. And I told – the first conversation I had with staff members is, “Let’s take a look at the environment background. Let’s see what really needs to be in environment. Do we really need 30 puzzles on the shelves?” Because a lot of things too is that if you put a lot of materials out, it becomes overwhelming for children and then it becomes those throwing mechanisms as we saw in the chart earlier. That’s the second highest amount of incidents was throwing toys.

So you have a lot of things to throw and not being able to be utilized as the way it is, it causes that unsafe environment for children. So I really had the staff really take a look at that and identify what was the highest need that had to be in the classrooms and what didn’t. So we put a lot of second storage and they look to get them there. So they’re able to rotate the toys and seek that stimulation for children in the classroom by rotating those toys.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s really nice. You snuck in a little 5S there where you sorted these toys can in stored, these can be out. But then you rotate them back in. So that’s your system, right? That your standard is a toy or a puzzle that’s out there for a month, whatever it is, and a new one comes in.

Lesley Guertin: Yup.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s great. Really genius.

Internal Referral Form

Lesley Guertin: So as I said before in my matrix, this is my internal referral form. I kind of developed this form. So now that – by developing internal referral form, behaviors and all special needs, some disabilities, some things that children are expressing, it will be observed and determined by myself or the other Quality Specialists.

by developing internal referral form, behaviors and all special needs, some disabilities, some things that children are expressing, it will be observed and determined by myself or the other Quality Specialists.

So I have very detailed things in this form which will then collect my data moving forward for any kind of referral. And this is – a teacher sees a child with some really aggressive behaviors, they want to refer them out. So they fill out this form. They email it to myself and the other Quality Assurance Specialists. We both go out to do some intensive observations. We type out some strategies for the staff and help them implement them in the classrooms. So we’re there. We’re there at the forefront. As soon as we get this in, we go right – we got to do that work.

We also follow up with the staff via email or phone call to say, “How is it working for you? Do we have to make some more changes?” In that way, if I’m going in and nothing changed, maybe the environment needs to be tweaked again. So kind of really looking at the surroundings and things like that. So this internal referral form has been really beneficial for us to be using as an agency to get the list resources right out there to staff and the children as well.

Elisabeth Swan: So really recognize when there’s something that has to get dealt with.

Lesley Guertin: Right.

Elisabeth Swan: And maybe the kids transferred out but maybe not, maybe that you just get the support. You give them the support they need.

Lesley Guertin: Absolutely. If we can do it internally, that’s great. However, if we do need to refer them out for JRI, for mental health services or behavioral services or even to the public school for more evaluations to get tested for anything. And we make that final call before our next step is to go – to get some external referral stuff.

Elisabeth Swan: Have there been an internal referral form before?

Lesley Guertin: There was one before. It was very vague. And when I looked – when I take a look at it, it really didn’t make sense to me and what they wanted to accomplish with this form. It was very generic. Basically, it spoke to an external referral.

Elisabeth Swan: It was a one way ticket. It wasn’t really trying to diagnose or …

Lesley Guertin: Correct. Correct. So we’re looking at more things internally before taking that next step to say, “Yes, let’s refer the child out to some external agency.”

Elisabeth Swan: Interesting. So you dealt with the environment of the classroom to cut down on some of the more prevalent types of incidents and then you redeveloped this internal referral form to handle what might be behavioral issues that are beyond what the environment can control. So, kind of a one-two partnered.

Lesley Guertin: Yeah. This is basically like the sifting out of those incidents. Is it special need? Is it really mental health issue for this child or this family? So, really taking a look at it even deeper than just taking the number of incidents. Now, we can really look at it hands on and we’re able to do that right away within a week to go out to these classrooms.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s great. This is great. Thanks for describing that.

Lesley Guertin: Welcome.

Run Chart of Improved Incident Reporting

So over here is basically my price of the – of my whole presentation. But it’s noted that the decline in incidents regarding the classrooms where the environments were changed. And also, notice the spike of the incidents from March to April. And the cause of that is the classroom environment is changed back to the original state.

So when I first did this, I said, “Wow! What is going on here?” We started to spike down low and then spike up high. And then when I really dug deeper and spoke to the Center Manager, the teacher was not satisfied with the classroom management so she went back to square one which caused the spike because now, you’re seeing the incidents are so back up with just that little tweak of the environment.

Elisabeth Swan: And that’s something that a lot of people doing process improvement experience. You got change is foreign. People are uncomfortable. They don’t necessarily see the benefits. So the slipping back to an old way, an old process is always a danger but it sounds like for the most part, you had a lot more conformance and you kept out reforming the layouts for other classrooms as you went along.

Lesley Guertin: So as I went along, you can kind of tell and you’d target where you want to go. What’s the most they want to go first? And I think the highest number of incidents is happening in these three sites. You have West Main that I gave you an example of, Hyannis and West Yarmouth with those high numbers, high, high numbers.

So going in and just making those site adjustments to the environment really drastically impacted the amount of incident reports that were coming in to me.

…So going in and just making those site adjustments to the environment really drastically impacted the amount of incident reports that were coming in to me.

Elisabeth Swan: How is it going now since the process is in the control phase and those changes had been made? I know you had a little – a few more reversions to other setups.

Lesley Guertin: It is. So in our last West Yarmouth site, the teacher again switched the environment without consultation. And now, we’re noticing as we are still collecting the data is that there was – there are huge increases of incidents that are coming into us from West Yarmouth. So we’re diving in deeper now and really going out there much often and having conversations with the teacher because the teacher has her own way and she likes her own way. And really understanding the impact in her classroom when that change first happened.

Elisabeth Swan: She needs to see your run chart.

Lesley Guertin: She does need to see my run chart because it does, I mean if you see it, it kind of – and we can just – and we can break it down to West Yarmouth alone and show her the…

Elisabeth Swan: What’s the trend? What the influence?

Lesley Guertin: The incurrence of the incidents as well from just this September to now we’re in January.

Elisabeth Swan: Yeah, so more to come.

Lesley Guertin: More to come. To be continued.

Elisabeth Swan: To be continued. Nice work, Lesley.

Control Phase

Project Benefits and Lessons Learned

Lesley Guertin: So my lessons learned. So I’ve learned that the impact of physical change in the environment can make a difference in the behaviors of children in the classroom.

I’ve learned that the impact of physical change in the environment can make a difference in the behaviors of children in the classroom.

Also, it’s better to look at the examples of the Bahama Bistro and then interpret into your own process, with the voice of the customer and the process walk. That was really helpful when I was figuring out how to do my projects.

Elisabeth Swan: You were quite good. You really looked at those examples and then you completely all relate it into your world.

Lesley Guertin: Because kind of looking at something that is for-profit such as a restaurant to something that is totally a different world especially being in a nonprofit agency, it’s hugely different. It’s a totally different culture. So you have to see what you have. You have to look at your examples and then try to interpret it into your own data. And what is it – how is it going to work for you? I’m not saying it’s going to work for you but how can I make this work for my process?

Also the benefits, observing and determining if children will need special needs that are behavior services will impact the quality of services for children we provide then classroom support is not needed.

Elisabeth Swan: Really nice job, Lesley. I love your use of the tools and how you adapted just studying out layout and made that work for you. And obviously, you make great use of the data. You really tracked the stuff and you did some very targeted pilots and then you checked. How did that work? And then you came back and said, “OK, let me do another one.”

Questions?

Elisabeth Swan: So just a few questions for you, one, you just mentioned that you looked at those examples from the Bahama Bistro and really tried to interpret it because as you said the nonprofit culture is so different from the for profit culture. So do you have any advice for someone who is looking to apply process improvement in the nonprofit industry now having done it yourself?

Lesley Guertin: I think look at your data. Your data tells a story. So you have to incorporate and interpret your data and see where it’s going to take you because it’s going to take you in a totally different direction. Reading my data, you’re looking at number then looking at the cause, why? Then I’m kind of making some improvements and changing the classroom environment and then moving forward.

Your data tells a story. So you have to incorporate and interpret your data and see where it’s going to take you because it’s going to take you in a totally different direction.

And I think not only has Six Sigma helps with helping interpret my data but it has helped me with just my life in general. I’m taking it to another level of everything. I’m looking at it with Six Sigma eyes and really kind of interpreting it even in my own business.

Elisabeth Swan: Oh, what you have done in your own business?

Lesley Guertin: So I’ve been actually tracking some data in my own business.

Elisabeth Swan: No!

Lesley Swan: I have the number of orders that I’m getting a day and then I’m looking at the time it takes and where I actually should get them out. So I’m looking at all …

Elisabeth Swan: In order to ship?

Lesley Guertin: Yup. All the stuff I’m using Six Sigma not only in my nonprofit but for my for-profit as well. So it’s really taking a really great tool in my life personally and professionally.

So it’s really taking a really great tool in my life personally and professionally.

Elisabeth Swan: Well, that’s a great story. And just to come back to it, the focus on the data, did the data help you with other people? Did it help you convince some of the people around what’s going to be good for the kids, good for the classroom?

Lesley Guertin: Absolutely, especially in my West Main site. What I was able to do is I was able to share that with the Center Manager there and actually the Lead Teacher to show her why we’re doing improvements. I’m not just coming in to change your environment because I want to. But there is purpose to that. And here’s the data that she sent me to actually make some final determinations on what we wanted to do with the environment.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s great. And did they have a hand in the referral form and sort of telling you what they needed or did you have any back and forth there?

Lesley Guertin: We had some back and forth. I think the – actually, it was a huge education piece for the staff there as they didn’t really dive into the ECERS tool, which is the environment tool that we use in the classroom. So really giving them the layout, the book, and then having them look through that themselves and thinking out the materials that they wanted to put out really made them – it incorporated them into that whole process.

So it wasn’t me just going in there, changing what I wanted to do and left it. I really took them in and said, “Well, this is why we’re doing this. This is the data. These are your facts.” And then of course we have the tool that we have to look at to see what is the appropriate and what’s not appropriate to put. And then having them make that final judgment, the final call, which is huge.

Elisabeth Swan: That’s great.

Lesley Guertin: And then that feedback afterwards in a few weeks, how was your environment working for you? And them having to say to me, “It’s like a whole different world,” kind of thing. So, really great.

Elisabeth Swan: So that’s helpful. And I think that’s the truth whether you’re in profit or nonprofit that you really got to involve your stakeholders in that communication and that feedback, the helpful loops as you’re designing new forms, as you’re designing new processes, and also, you ended up educating them, giving them more background on classroom setups. And then I think back to your own experience that it’s all about the data and you took that straight from nonprofit into profit world.

Lesley Guertin: Absolutely.

Elisabeth Swan: So that is a truism. That’s great. I’m Elisabeth Swan. You’re listening to a GoLeanSixSigma.com’s success story highlighting Lesley Guertin of Cape Cod Child Development.

Lesley, I want to thank you for joining us today.

Lesley Guertin: You’re welcome. Thank you.

Elisabeth Swan: And thank you for sharing your success story. I also want to thank our listeners for joining us today. I hope you found the success story as helpful and as inspirational as I did.

Getting Started

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Until next time, goodbye now. Thanks for joining us.



Get the inside scoop on many other successful Lean Six Sigma projects at our Super Stories of Success page. Do you have a story to tell? We’d love to hear about your own project success! Please contact us.

Elisabeth Swan

Elisabeth is a Managing Partner at GoLeanSixSigma.com, the co-author of The Problem-Solver’s Toolkit and co-host of the Just-in-Time Cafe. For over 25 years, she's helped leading organizations like Amazon, Charles Schwab and Starwood Hotels & Resorts build problem-solving muscles with Lean Six Sigma to achieve their goals.